Los de Abajo

Los de Abajo started as friends, university students living the day-to-day hard reality experienced by the Mexican people, before they began searching for the perfect musical tool to spread information and denounce injustice.

Los de Abajo, the band, their name taken from Mexican writer Mariano Azuela’s novel of the same name, forged their identity on a revolutionary spirit, playing at students’ and workers’ rallies, with artists, Zapatista soldiers, gay and women’s rights movements, and many other groups of free-thinkers from outside the mainstream.

On September 15th, 1992 Los de Abajo played at the Mexican Independence Anniversary; this performance was the first step in a long road of struggle for a different way of living and thinking. Immersed in a Mexico with a long history of poverty, suffocated by the oligarchy, plunder, and corruption, the group’s combative and energy-filled fusion of music has been influenced by the global nature of our times. Using their music, made up of salsa, merengue, cumbia, punk, rap, reggae, rock, and Mexican traditions such as son Jarocho, Northern music, and banda sinaloense, Los de Abajo began to spread information and ideas.

Over the years, Los de Abajo have made people dance in more than 30 countries, have set foot in four continents, and have participated in prestigious festivals such as the Glastonbury Festival, the Paleo Festival, the Gurten Festival and WOMAD.

In 2006 they released, LDA vs. The Lunatics for Real World Records, which included a cover of Fun Boy Three’s ‘The Lunatics Have Taken Over The Asylum’.

After all these years full of experience, struggle and learning Los de Abajo continue to offer a powerful and danceable musical experience.

Further reading

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